CRMC » Patients Rights

Patients Rights

1. Access to Care

Individuals shall be accorded impartial access to treatment or accommodations that are available or medically indicated, regardless of race, creed, sex, age, national origin, sources of payment for care, or the presence or lack of an Advance Directive. The patient has the right to have a family member or representative notified promptly of his or her admission to the hospital. The patient has the right to receive care in a safe setting. Every patient has the right to be free from all forms of abuse or harassment.

2. Respect and Dignity

The patient and family has the right to considerate, respectful care at all times and under all circumstances, with recognition of personal dignity and respect for his or her personal values and beliefs.

3. Privacy and Confidentiality

The patient and family has the right, within the law, to personal and information privacy, as manifested by the following rights:

A.To refuse to talk with or see anyone not officially connected with the hospital, including visitors, or persons officially connected with the hospital but not directly involved in his/her care.
B.To wear appropriate personal clothing and religious or other symbolic items, as long as they do not directly interfere in his/her care.

4. Consideration

The patient and family has the right to considerations of the psychosocial, spiritual, and cultural variables that influence the perceptions of illness, recovery, death, and the grieving process.

5. Safety/Security

The patient has the right to expect reasonable safety precautions to be taken by the hospital and reasonable precautions for providing a secure environment.

6. Pain Management

The patient can expect:
1.Information about pain and pain relief measures
2.A concerned staff committed to pain prevention and management
3.Health professionals who respond quickly to reports of pain
4.Their reports of pain to be believed
5.Dedicated pain relief specialists
6.Pain relief
7. Information

The patient has the right to receive, at the time of admission, information about the hospital’s patient rights policy and the mechanism for the initiation, review, and, when possible, resolution of patient complaints concerning quality of care.

The patient has the right to obtain, from the practitioner responsible for coordinating their care, complete and current information concerning the patient’s diagnosis (to the degree known), treatment, and any know prognosis.

This information should be communicated in terms the patient and family can reasonably be expected to understand. The patient has the right to access information contained in the patient’s record, within the limits of the law and hospital policy.

The patient shall be provided information regarding professional or business relationship to another health care provider or institution that might suggest a conflict of interest.

Information shall be made available regarding the hospital’s relationship to education institutions involved in patient care.

8. Consent

The patient and family have the right to reasonable informed participation in decisions involving their health care. To the degree possible, this should be based on a clear, concise explanation of their condition and of all proposed technical procedures.

The patient shall not be subjected to any procedure without his/her voluntary, competent, and understanding consent or the consent of his/her legally authorized representative.

The patient has the right to know who is responsible for ordering and performing the procedures or treatment.

The patient shall be informed if the hospital proposes to engage in or perform human experimentation or other research/educational projects affecting his/her care or treatment. The patient has the right to refuse to participate in any such activity and will only participate if informed consent is given.

9. Consultation

The patient and family, at their own request and expense, have the right to consult with a specialist of their choice. However, for in-house consultation, the physician must have privileges at this facility.

10. Refusal of Treatment

The patient or family may refuse treatment to the extent permitted by law. When refusal of treatment by the patient or his/her legally authorized representative prevents the provision of appropriate care in accordance with professional standards, the relationship with the physician and patient and/or family may be terminated upon reasonable notice.

11. Transfer and Continuity of Care

The patient may not be transferred to another facility or organization unless he/she or the family have received a complete explanation of the need for the transfer and of the alternatives to such a transfer, and unless the other facility or organization has the capacity to treat and accept the patient. The patient and family have the right to be informed by the practitioner responsible for his/her care, or his/her delegate, of any continuing health care requirements following discharge from the hospital.

12. Hospital Charges

Regardless of the source of payment for his/her care, the patient and family have the right to request and receive an itemized bill and details explaining the total bill for services rendered in the hospital. The patient or family has the right to timely notice prior to termination of this eligibility for reimbursement by any third-party payer for the cost of his/her care. The patient/family has the right, upon request, to receive from Admitting, Social Services or any information the hospital has regarding financial assistance and health programs sponsored by the State of Texas.

13. Dispute Resolution

The patient and their family have a right to express a concern or complaint concerning the hospital, their care, or a hospital employee without their care being affected. Complaints may be reported by the patient or their family by contacting a Supervisor or Administrator directly. Every complaint shall be resolved, if resolution is possible, within thirty (30) days of the inception of the complaint. The complainant shall be provided with written notice of the hospital’s decision within thirty (30) days of the inception of the complaint. Said written notice shall contain the name of the hospital, a contact person, the steps taken on behalf of the patient to investigate the complaint, the results of the complaint process and the date of completion.

14. Ethical Concerns

The patient and family have the right to access the Hospital Bio-Ethics Committee when patient care treatment decision conflicts arise.

Patients and or parents/family, care givers or physicians may contact the hospital administration anytime they have ethical concerns regarding treatment decisions.

15. Patient/Family Care Decisions and Advance Directives

Care sometimes requires that people other than (or in addition to) the patient be involved in decisions about the patients care. This is especially true when the patient does not have the mental or physical capacity to make care decisions. When the patient cannot make decisions regarding his/her care, a surrogate decision maker will be identified in accordance with the law. The patient has the right to exclude any or all family members from participating in his/her care. The patient has the right to execute an Advance Directive. The provision of care shall not be conditioned on the existence of an Advance Directive. An Advance Directive shall be in the patient’s medical record and shall be reviewed periodically with the patient and the surrogate decision-maker.

The patient’s guardian, next of km, or legally authorized responsible person has the right to exercise, to the extent permitted by law, the rights delineated on behalf of the patient, if the patient:

– Has been adjudicated incompetent in accordance with the law
– Is found by the physician to he medically incapable of understanding the proposed treatment or procedure
– Is unable to communicate his/her wishes regarding treatment
– Is a minor

16. Access to Protective Services

The hospital supports the patient’s right to access Social Services. The hospital has resources to help patients and families determine a patient’s need for special services.

17. Restraints for Acute Medical and Surgical Care

The patient has the right to be free from restraints of any form that are not medically necessary or are used as a means of coercion, discipline, convenience, or retaliation by staff. The term ‘restraint’ includes either a physical restraint or a drug that is being used as a restraint. A physical restraint is any manual method or physical or mechanical device, material, or equipment attached or adjacent to the patient’s body that he/she cannot easily remove, that restricts freedom of movement or normal access to one’s body. A drug used as a restraint is a medication used to control behavior or to restrict the patient’s freedom of movement and is not a standard treatment for the patient’s medical or psychiatric condition.

A. Restraints will only be used if needed to improve the patient’s well-being and less restrictive interventions have been determined to be ineffective.

B. The use of restraints must be:

1. Selected only when other less restrictive measures have been found to be ineffective to protect
the patient or others from harm;

2. In accordance with a physician’s order or other licensed independent practitioner permitted by the State of Texas and hospital to order restraint. This order must:

a. Never be written as a standing or on an as needed (PRN) basis;

b. Be followed by consultation with the patient’s treating physician, as soon as possible, if the restraint is not ordered by the patient’s treating physician;

3. In accordance with a written modification to the patient’s plan of care;

4. Implemented in the least restrictive manner possible;

5. In accordance with safe and appropriate restraining techniques; and

6. Ended at the earliest possible time.

C. The condition of the restrained patient will be continually assessed, monitored, and reevaluated.

D. All staff who have direct patient contact will have ongoing education and training in the proper and safe use of restraints.

II. Patient Responsibilities

1. Access to Care

Individuals shall be accorded impartial access to treatment or accommodations that are available or medically indicated, regardless of race, creed, sex, age, national origin, sources of payment for care, or the presence or lack of an Advance Directive. The patient has the right to have a family member or representative notified promptly of his or her admission to the hospital. The patient has the right to receive care in a safe setting. Every patient has the right to be free from all forms of abuse or harassment.

2. Respect and Dignity

The patient and family has the right to considerate, respectful care at all times and under all circumstances, with recognition of personal dignity and respect for his or her personal values and beliefs.

3. Privacy and Confidentiality

The patient and family has the right, within the law, to personal and information privacy, as manifested by the following rights:
1.To refuse to talk with or see anyone not officially connected with the hospital, including visitors, or persons officially connected with the hospital but not directly involved in his/her care.
2.To wear appropriate personal clothing and religious or other symbolic items, as long as they do not directly interfere in his/her care.

4. Consideration

The patient and family has the right to considerations of the psychosocial, spiritual, and cultural variables that influence the perceptions of illness, recovery, death, and the grieving process.

5. Safety/Security

The patient has the right to expect reasonable safety precautions to be taken by the hospital and reasonable precautions for providing a secure environment.

6. Pain Management

The patient can expect:
1.Information about pain and pain relief measures
2.A concerned staff committed to pain prevention and management
3.Health professionals who respond quickly to reports of pain
4.Their reports of pain to be believed
5.Dedicated pain relief specialists
6.Pain relief

7. Information

The patient has the right to receive, at the time of admission, information about the hospital’s patient rights policy and the mechanism for the initiation, review, and, when possible, resolution of patient complaints concerning quality of care.

The patient has the right to obtain, from the practitioner responsible for coordinating their care, complete and current information concerning the patient’s diagnosis (to the degree known), treatment, and any know prognosis.

This information should be communicated in terms the patient and family can reasonably be expected to understand. The patient has the right to access information contained in the patient’s record, within the limits of the law and hospital policy.

The patient shall be provided information regarding professional or business relationship to another health care provider or institution that might suggest a conflict of interest.

Information shall be made available regarding the hospital’s relationship to education institutions involved in patient care.

8. Consent

The patient and family have the right to reasonable informed participation in decisions involving their health care. To the degree possible, this should be based on a clear, concise explanation of their condition and of all proposed technical procedures.

The patient shall not be subjected to any procedure without his/her voluntary, competent, and understanding consent or the consent of his/her legally authorized representative.

The patient has the right to know who is responsible for ordering and performing the procedures or treatment.

The patient shall be informed if the hospital proposes to engage in or perform human experimentation or other research/educational projects affecting his/her care or treatment. The patient has the right to refuse to participate in any such activity and will only participate if informed consent is given.

9. Consultation

The patient and family, at their own request and expense, have the right to consult with a specialist of their choice. However, for in-house consultation, the physician must have privileges at this facility.

10. Refusal of Treatment

The patient or family may refuse treatment to the extent permitted by law. When refusal of treatment by the patient or his/her legally authorized representative prevents the provision of appropriate care in accordance with professional standards, the relationship with the physician and patient and/or family may be terminated upon reasonable notice.

11. Transfer and Continuity of Care

The patient may not be transferred to another facility or organization unless he/she or the family have received a complete explanation of the need for the transfer and of the alternatives to such a transfer, and unless the other facility or organization has the capacity to treat and accept the patient. The patient and family have the right to be informed by the practitioner responsible for his/her care, or his/her delegate, of any continuing health care requirements following discharge from the hospital.

12. Hospital Charges

Regardless of the source of payment for his/her care, the patient and family have the right to request and receive an itemized bill and details explaining the total bill for services rendered in the hospital. The patient or family has the right to timely notice prior to termination of this eligibility for reimbursement by any third-party payer for the cost of his/her care. The patient/family has the right, upon request, to receive from Admitting, Social Services or any information the hospital has regarding financial assistance and health programs sponsored by the State of Texas.

13. Dispute Resolution

The patient and their family have a right to express a concern or complaint concerning the hospital, their care, or a hospital employee without their care being affected. Complaints may be reported by the patient or their family by contacting a Supervisor or Administrator directly. Every complaint shall be resolved, if resolution is possible, within thirty (30) days of the inception of the complaint. The complainant shall be provided with written notice of the hospital’s decision within thirty (30) days of the inception of the complaint. Said written notice shall contain the name of the hospital, a contact person, the steps taken on behalf of the patient to investigate the complaint, the results of the complaint process and the date of completion.

14. Ethical Concerns

The patient and family have the right to access the Hospital Bio-Ethics Committee when patient care treatment decision conflicts arise.

Patients and or parents/family, care givers or physicians may contact the hospital administration anytime they have ethical concerns regarding treatment decisions.

15. Patient/Family Care Decisions and Advance Directives

Care sometimes requires that people other than (or in addition to) the patient be involved in decisions about the patients care. This is especially true when the patient does not have the mental or physical capacity to make care decisions. When the patient cannot make decisions regarding his/her care, a surrogate decision maker will be identified in accordance with the law. The patient has the right to exclude any or all family members from participating in his/her care. The patient has the right to execute an Advance Directive. The provision of care shall not be conditioned on the existence of an Advance Directive. An Advance Directive shall be in the patient’s medical record and shall be reviewed periodically with the patient and the surrogate decision-maker.

The patient’s guardian, next of km, or legally authorized responsible person has the right to exercise, to the extent permitted by law, the rights delineated on behalf of the patient, if the patient:

– Has been adjudicated incompetent in accordance with the law
– Is found by the physician to he medically incapable of understanding the proposed treatment or procedure
– Is unable to communicate his/her wishes regarding treatment
– Is a minor

16. Access to Protective Services

The hospital supports the patient’s right to access Social Services. The hospital has resources to help patients and families determine a patient’s need for special services.

17. Restraints for Acute Medical and Surgical Care

The patient has the right to be free from restraints of any form that are not medically necessary or are used as a means of coercion, discipline, convenience, or retaliation by staff. The term ‘restraint’ includes either a physical restraint or a drug that is being used as a restraint. A physical restraint is any manual method or physical or mechanical device, material, or equipment attached or adjacent to the patient’s body that he/she cannot easily remove, that restricts freedom of movement or normal access to one’s body. A drug used as a restraint is a medication used to control behavior or to restrict the patient’s freedom of movement and is not a standard treatment for the patient’s medical or psychiatric condition.

A. Restraints will only be used if needed to improve the patient’s well-being and less restrictive interventions have been determined to be ineffective.

B. The use of restraints must be:

1. Selected only when other less restrictive measures have been found to be ineffective to protect
the patient or others from harm;

2. In accordance with a physician’s order or other licensed independent practitioner permitted by the State of Texas and hospital to order restraint. This order must:

a. Never be written as a standing or on an as needed (PRN) basis;

b. Be followed by consultation with the patient’s treating physician, as soon as possible, if the restraint is not ordered by the patient’s treating physician;

3. In accordance with a written modification to the patient’s plan of care;

4. Implemented in the least restrictive manner possible;

5. In accordance with safe and appropriate restraining techniques; and

6. Ended at the earliest possible time.

C. The condition of the restrained patient will be continually assessed, monitored, and reevaluated.

D. All staff who have direct patient contact will have ongoing education and training in the proper and safe use of restraints.

III. Hospital Responsibilities

We will:
•Introduce ourselves
•Tell the truth
•Listen
•Protect your privacy and information.
•Explain so that you can understand.
•Make sure you are safe and secure.
•Let you make some of your own decisions.
•Listen to your feelings because it is OK to feel sad, happy, lonely, scared, or excited.
•Do what we can to make you feel better.
•Help you with your special needs of hearing or speech.
•Let you and your parents talk to other doctors.
•Help you to go to another facility if you need to.
•Help you if you have a problem with your care.
•Encourage your family to visit and for a parent to stay with you.

IV. Admitting Responsibilities

During the admitting process, each patient admitted to the hospital will be given a Patient Rights and Responsibilities brochure.

contact us